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Chipmunk Removal


Chipmunk RemovalBy A. Page

In cartoons chipmunks are cute and funny.  They sing and dance and cause trouble.  In real life, one quality remains, they cause trouble.  When you’ve worked diligently on your landscape and garden, a few chipmunks can really start to put ‘holes’ in your plans, quite literally.  One day there’s one burrow,  and the next it seems there are fifty.

Regardless of whether you want them dead or just off your lawn, a variety of options are available to you.

Natural Methods for chipmunk removal

Mothballs. This method is a fifty-fifty. I’ve had saucy chipmunks brave the smell, and other years- they’ve kept away from my yard entirely.  Place the mothballs around the foundation of your home and around anything you wish to protect.  If you’re lucky, the chipmunks will stay away from the perimeter you’ve set out for them.

Put out items they hate to smell. By or around the holes, try sprinkling blood meal, thawed sticks of gum, or the traditional mothballs.

Get an outdoor cat. If you already have one, then perhaps one of the other methods would bet better.  However, most cats have a natural instinct to kill and eat small rodents.

Spicy herbs and sauces. This will keep chipmunks from chewing on your garden.  However, the capsaicin will also keep certain beneficial pollinators from coming around.  If you think you can afford the loss, give this a try.

Trapping and Killing

Purchase a live animal trap. Scatter nuts like peanuts or cashews around the trap to attract the chipmunks to the trap.  Put more treasured items inside, such as sunflower seeds.  When the chipmunks are caught, release them in accordance to local animal control laws.

Good old mouse traps. Peanut butter, oatmeal, and sunflower seeds are great bait.  But you do have to watch out, squirrels are known to steal the bait away.  However, this method is quick and painless to the chipmunks.

Bucket half full of water. Easy enough, but also pretty traumatic when dealing with the remains.  Lean a plank against a bucket half full of water, line the plank with seeds and treats.  The chipmunks will follow the trail and die.

There are plenty of methods to take into account, but you should also keep your family in mind.  If you have young children, the idea of trapping and killing may not be something you wish to introduce to them.  In the same way, you may not agree with killing them.  Though you may have to try a few options, you’re bound to have a natural option that works for you.  You may have noticed poison wasn’t an option, and there are plenty of reasons why.  With poison pellets, you never know what animal may pick them up.  Second, you never know what damage poison may have to your and your family (pets, too).

Happy hunting!